Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Webinar will explore relationship between farm workers and gardens

A webinar on the topic “For We Are Co-Workers in God’s Service” is planned for Tuesday, Nov. 18, at 7 p.m. (eastern time) to explore the relationship between farm workers and gardens.

Where do our fruits and vegetables come from? Who is responsible for seeing that these foods are harvested for us to buy and eat? What are the lives of these farm workers like? And how does our faith connect us to our brothers and sisters who do this work?

Through the Going to the Garden grant initiative of the Office of Public Witness and Global Food Crisis Fund, this webinar will focus on issues surrounding the national farm workers movement to create better work and living standards. The webinar will hear from individuals deeply involved with the National Farm Worker Ministry (NFWM) and the NFWM's Youth and Young Adult network in order to understand what these two groups are doing to support farm workers. It also will discuss how individuals can show support and solidarity in their own communities through initiatives like Going to the Garden.


Lindsay Andreolli-Comstock
Lindsay Andreolli-Comstock, an ordained Baptist minister and human-trafficking specialist, serves as executive director of the National Farm Worker Ministry. She served for four years as a human-trafficking specialist in Southeast Asia. She is a former member of the Board of Directors of the Alliance of Baptists and a doctoral candidate at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary.

Nico Gumbs
Nico Gumbs is the Florida state coordinator of the National Farm Worker Ministry’s youth-led program, YAYA. He has been in the agriculture sector most of his life, from growing up on a farm in avocado groves, to more than eight years with Future Farmers of America (FFA), and now active in the farmworker movement for more than three years.

Daniel McClain
Daniel McClain is director of Program Operations for Graduate Theological Programs at Loyola University Maryland. His areas of research and publishing include the doctrine of creation, theologies of education and formation, political theology, and theologies of art and image. In addition to these areas, he also has led classes and workshops on the theology and ethics of work and creativity.

Join us as we discuss how farm workers are organizing, how individuals and groups are becoming involved, and what we can all do about it in our own communities and churches. To register for this webinar, send an e-mail to kfurrow@brethren.org with your name and contact information.

-- Katie Furrow recently began a term of Brethren Volunteer Service (BVS) working with the Church of the Brethren Office of Public Witness.

Source: 10/28/2014 Newsline

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